GHOST BETTING TIPS

Super Bowl Coin Toss: All You Need To Know

Share on facebook
Share on whatsapp
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

The Super Bowl coin toss is one of the main sports betting props highlights of the year.

The Super Bowl itself provides opportunities to make money, from the spread to betting on unique and wonderful props, including the coin toss.

But it’s often misunderstood by bettors.

Read on to learn all you need to know about betting the Super Bowl coin toss.

Super Bowl Coin Toss Odds

The Super Bowl coin toss has become so important to the event that a special coin is made for the occasion.

Both teams are etched into the tails side of the coin, with the venue and date of the game on the heads side.

Interestingly, some theorists claim that the coin is biased…

…but rest assured that it’s not.

The Super Bowl coin toss odds are equal and fair.

Every year.

How Does The Super Bowl Coin Toss Work?

The Super Bowl coin toss has become so iconic, organizers now bring in a nominated celebrity to flip it.

The coin toss takes place around three minutes before the game starts.

Each year, the designated home team switches between the winners of the NFC and AFC.

Winners of the NFC are designated as the home team for odd-numbered Super Bowls.

Similarly, winners of the AFC are designated as the home team for even-numbered Super Bowls.

This is important.

Here’s why.

Being the home team means they decide on the color of their jersey, while the away team gets to call the coin toss, though this will not alter the odds.

13 of the past 15 winners of the Super Bowl have worn white jerseys.

Once the away team calls heads or tails, the referee confirms the call while the coin is tossed.

This ensures that the call is correct.

The team that calls the winning coin toss then chooses between receiving the ball or choosing the side of the field they wish to start in.

Since there is no advantage in choosing the end of the field, the standard decision is to receive the ball.

Does The Super Bowl Coin Toss Result Matter?

Out of the past 53 Super Bowls, the winner of the coin toss has gone on to win the game 24 times.

This represents a 45% win rate.

On the other hand, the winner of the coin toss has gone on to lose the game 29 times.

This represents a 55% lose rate.

Here’s a history of past coin toss winners and how they fared:

To some, this could be seen as a slight bias towards betting against the winner of the coin toss.

In reality, it doesn’t make a difference to the result.

The Super Bowl coin toss is completely random.

If you were to bet on it, you must know that there isn’t much value.

It’s simply there for you to have a bit more fun on the big game.

For those of you that want to know more about betting on the Super Bowl in general, we have written a complete guide:

How To Bet On The NFL

The definitive guide

How To Bet On The NFL

The definitive guide

Why The Super Bowl Coin Toss Is Random

An interesting note from the table above…

The NFC divisional champions won the coin toss between Super Bowl XXXII in 1998 and Super Bowl XLV in 2011.

This represents a 14-game win streak.

The chances of this happening are 1 in 16,384.

NFC divisional champions have also won 35 of the 53 coin tosses, adding further fuel to claims that it’s biased.

Here’s why this isn’t true.

Firstly, every Super Bowl coin toss is independent of the previous toss.

The coin cannot remember previous results.

Also, 53 games really isn’t that large of a sample size to claim such a thing.

This is due to the law of large numbers.

Those that claim the coin toss is biased do not have an understanding of probability.

This is one of the many trap holes that beginners to sports betting fall down.

Sports Betting For Beginners

Here are 6 things you must know

Sports Betting For Beginners

Here are 6 things you must know

Should You Bet On The Super Bowl Coin Toss?

If you are a serious sports investor looking for value in every bet, you should avoid betting on the Super Bowl coin toss.

On the other hand, if you want to add some extra excitement to the big game, it’s a fun bet to make.

The odds of the coin landing on heads or tails are 50/50.

In theory, sportsbooks should price each at +100 with no margin.

However, this almost never happens.

Instead, they’re usually priced at -110.

Conclusion

This is all you need to know about betting on the Super Bowl Coin toss.

Have you bet on it before?

Will you bet on it for the next Super Bowl?

Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter.

Found This Useful? Share It With A Friend.

Share on facebook
Share on whatsapp
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin